Who is the Typical Expat (Client)?

There is no “typical” expat. But I can share who is the typical Expat Yourself client.

Since I created “Gone in One Year” program, I fell in love with building info graphics. Info graphics are those colourful pages of icons and one-liners that speak volumes. Well, here’s a quickie that illustrates my typical consulting client.

 

Sail Away From the Safe Harbor

It’s time.

Every so often I write a very simple post. Like this one today.

It’s time for you to sail away from the safe harbour. As Mark Twain is often cited, with his full quote overlaid a pretty picture here:

Sail Away Mark Twain
Become an Expat Yourself – Sail away from your safe harbor

Interaction is Key

I’ve been promising to write a “how-to” guide for you for ages. The trouble is, an “info-book” is not really helpful, not like real interaction. (In fact, I know someone selling such a book – but it turns out to be just a “how to make money online” guide, in a “travel anywhere” wrapper. Little smarmy in my opinion, but that’s his gig.)

Info-books do not help, as real interaction does.
That’s why consulting works well. However, consulting is pricey ($150/hour) for some folks. Finally, I fixed the price problem!

The solution: general consulting, in e-mails. New material sent every few days. Packaged in a full 1-year program: Step-by-Step Expat Consulting. Very cheap monthly fee (Trying it out – will likely raise down the road)

Sneak Peek

Yes, you, gone in 1 year, guaranteed or money back. The 12-month program is called “Gone in 1 Year” (heehee!)

Here is a sneak peek at it.

Interested? I’m officially launching in a few days, but sign up is open now.

 

What Your Grandparents Are Wishing They Told You

The worst thing in the world is regret. Many people as they get older can’t help but wish “If only I …“.

Don’t be that person. Here’s help how…

grandma tells us how it is
Grandma tells us how it is

This post is not a list of top regrets (too predictable). Far better, this is your grandparents’ advice, looking back to their younger selves.

The most popular ways to avoid regret, right here: Continue reading What Your Grandparents Are Wishing They Told You

Foreign Born Americans Can Become President

From high school civics class, I remember a US presidential candidate…:

  1. Must be 35 years or older
  2. Must be a natural-born US citizen (not a “naturalized” American)
  3. Must have lived in the US for 14 years
Checklist
Checklist

Okay, I lied. Above is true, but below is how I actually remember it: Continue reading Foreign Born Americans Can Become President

TPP Deal Reached. Time to Move to Europe

Well, a deal got reached. The Super Rich & Powerful© people have agreed on the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP).

“So what.” So what? So, what is the TPP?

“Who knows?” The TPP has got to be one of the hottest debates over which no one really knows what they’re talking about. The actual TPP text is a secret and will be for several more weeks. The heads of those dozen countries and CEOs of many corporations are debating about it. The rest of us schmoes only hear it’s really bad for the workers and fantastic for the companies. But do we really know anything? No. Just that it’s “bad”™ , for all that’s worth.

Well, I say, if it’s so bad, and you’re so mad, then do something about it.

Stop waiting and do something. Start learning a language. Outstanding opportunity here to learn French online or English online. Write a goal date on your calendar. Start taking the daily, baby steps toward your move. But just start.

Using Your Outside Voice – Vote

This post is for my friend Joe, a new Canadian. Joe is married to Steph, an old university friend of my wife’s. And Joe, an American, just got his Canadian citizenship a few months ago. Congrats Joe!

Joe’s shiny new citizenship grants him the right to vote. Today!

First Time to Vote, You Lucky Bastard!
Way to Go, Joe!

Today, October 19th 2015 is election day for Canada. Tonight we find out if Stephen Harper, the current leader, will stay on.

Or, perhaps we’ll have Justin Trudeau, leader of the Liberal party.

Or, Tom Mulcair, leader of the NDP party.

If You Are Canadian…

Continue reading Using Your Outside Voice – Vote

What Does English Sound Like?

Ever wonder what English sounds like, if you don’t speak English?

Watch and enjoy:

Pretty neat, isn’t it? It’s as if you know they’re speaking English, but you just can’t understand them, like they’re speaking too softly. But it’s not English at all, it’s nonsense; no real communication at all. And if you’re a native English speaker, you know this to be true immediately.

Continue reading What Does English Sound Like?

Why Learn a New Language

I’m writing a post on why to learn a foreign language? Really? The question shouldn’t be “why” but “why not??
But what the hell, I’ll go with the “why.”

First, I’ll bet today, you believe you’re smart enough, attractive enough, interesting enough and people like you. Am I right?
Continue reading Why Learn a New Language

Six-Hour Work Day: It Works!

Dammit Sweden. You’re in the news again, sounding like some utopian, heaven on Earth.

Haga Street

The city of Gothenburg, Sweden, hometown to family friends Annika, Ingvar and their two exceptional children, did an experiment. All employers in Gothenburg moved from an 8-hour to a 6-hour workday.  The results? Overwhelmingly positive.

The proposal for a 6-hour day was not a popular idea at first in Sweden. The idea was proposed over a year ago, and criticized hard from opposing political parties. Originally, it was be a national experiment, but I guess that was too great a risk to the economy. The powers-that-be accepted Gothenburg to be a local trial.

Adopting a 6-hour work day wasn’t a recent thing for all of Gothenburg. A Service Centre for Toyota (in Gothenburg) moved to the 6-hour shift more than a decade ago. And the switch is permanent since both workers and management are very happy with the change.

The Managing Director of the Toyota service centre, Martin Banck, reports that “Staff feel better, there is low turnover and it is easier to recruit new people.” And, as for the ‘bottom line,’ profits are up 25%. Yeah, that’s about as positive a testimony you can get.

How do workers feel about it? Well, everyone interviewed comments on the lack of traffic, higher energy while at work, more time with family. Sounds positive all around. I’m guessing Sweden will soon reconsider adopting a shorter work day on the national level and with a better attitude.

I almost wrote up a few paragraphs about why the 8-hour day is so common, but I won’t. History and industrialization aside, the facts today are clear: technology allows us to be more productive in less time. Many of us don’t even need to collect in one work building; we can perform our duties from home.

Have I ever been to Gothenburg? Yes, but very quickly, only passed through. An adventurous buddy and I did a crazy weekend drive from Prague, Czech Republic to Oslo, Norway and back. We did it under four days. (Remember the 80’s movie Cannonball Run? Yup.). So, I “saw” Gothenburg and from what I remember of the blur, it was beautiful. And with work hours like this, I’d be tempted to move there.

If you want more news about it, here’s a Guardian article.

Mind you, adopting a 6-hour work day does NOT mean more work days. It’s simply a 30-hour work week, instead of the 40-hour week we’re all accustomed to. How many of you feel you could do the same amount of work in 6 hours, instead of there for 8?

Don’t live to work. Instead, work so that you may live. The shorter that work time can be, the more life you have.

In Europe, Commute Time EQUALS Work Time

How Is Your Commute?

(AP Photo/Andy Wong)
(AP Photo/Andy Wong)

Does your boss count your morning and evening commute as work time?

Does your boss even care about your morning and evening commute?

If you live and work in Europe, your boss does care. And the time counts as work.

It started from a recent court decision, where a judge ruled in favour of the worker’s rights, according to the long-established Working Conditions Directive. In the case in question, the worker demanded his first and last appointments of the day count as work time because they were far from his home. Now, I believe if this were in America, the boss (& court) would still be laughing. But in Europe, the worker has definitive rights. Strong rights and those rights are well-enforced, thanks to the Working Time Directive.

What’s the Working Time Directive?

 

The Working Time Directive is a set of guaranteed rights for EU workers. The Directive sets the rules for acceptable working conditions within the European Union. And, compared to other western nations, those working time rules strongly favour the European employee, not the employer.

Here are some points, straight from the Directive:

  • a limit to weekly working hours, which must not exceed 48 hours on average, including any overtime
  • a minimum daily rest period of 11 consecutive hours in every 24
  • a rest break during working hours if the worker is on duty for longer than 6 hours
  • a minimum weekly rest period of 24 uninterrupted hours for each 7-day period, in addition to the 11 hours’ daily rest
  • paid annual leave of at least 4 weeks per year
  • extra protection for night work, e.g.
    • average working hours must not exceed 8 hours per 24-hour period,
    • night workers must not perform heavy or dangerous work for longer than 8 hours in any 24-hour period,
    • night workers have the right to free health assessments and, under certain circumstances, to transfer to day work.

How do those compare to your working time conditions, vacation time and rights? Yeah, I thought so. Maybe it’s time you moved to Europe.

Imagine your commute if in Europe…

bike commute

I remember well during my career years spent in Europe, particularly in the Czech Republic, where my 4-weeks of vacation allowed my family a lot of holidays throughout Europe. Far cheaper airfare and easy border crossing (nonexistent for Schengen nations) were the frosting on the cake.

Yes, getting a job in Europe is difficult. Very difficult if you lack a university education, strong experience and a determination to get there.
But it can be done. If you want my help, contact me.