Advice to a 16-Year Old

I get e-mail asking for help. E-mail every day. And I answer every one. Don’t believe me? Try me.

I’d say 85% of the e-mail I get is the same general request for help: get me overseas. For general e-mails, I give general help. See examples here.

But sometimes I get an e-mail that tugs at my heart. Today was one of them. A 16-year old wrote for some early life-direction advice. At first glance, it was almost “cute.” I mean, imagine, a 16 year old asking a total stranger (-me, of all people!) for advice. He doesn’t know me at all. He only knows I have travelled and he wants the same. Then I read it carefully. Continue reading Advice to a 16-Year Old

Thirteen Years of National Emergency

Heard the News?

Just in case you missed the news, US President Obama quietly extended the country’s status of national emergency. I’m guessing you missed that bit of news. Though, you probably didn’t miss the fact the year is now 2014.

I know what you’re thinking… it’s 2014, and the terrorist attack which killed nearly 3000 people on September 11, 2001 happened in 2001. That’s like …13 years ago. Yup, 13 years. Yup, the US, the most (insert here: powerful/wealthy/nuclear-tipped/war faring/inch-measuring) country in the world, still running scared in a state of national “Oh GAWD, the sky is falling!” emergency.

It's a trap!

Thirteen Years. Seriously?

Do you know what you were doing during the attack? For millions of Americans, it’s the annual conversation-starter question, if ever there was one.

Continue reading Thirteen Years of National Emergency

Holy Winter in Nova Scotia, Canada!

Whether you’re American thinking in Fahrenheit, or Canadian thinking in Celsius, it’s COLD here.

The temperature outside our house is now -15 (C). With the wind, we’re well past twenty below zero. (Dude, that’s cold.)

I’m no outdoorsman, not an Inuit, nor am I fond of cold in general. In fact, if I can share, I’m daydreaming of a toasty beach chair and a cool tropical drink with one of those little paper umbrellas.

Continue reading Holy Winter in Nova Scotia, Canada!

3 Examples How Travelling Changes Boring into Kick-Ass

On my blog, I only seek to inspire you to travel. That’s my purpose. To inspire you to push the comfort zone, explore the great world around you, and seek your own adventure.

Here are 3 examples of how 3 guys, Matt, Alex and Miguel, used travel to turn their normal thing into something kick-ass…

Continue reading 3 Examples How Travelling Changes Boring into Kick-Ass

The World’s 10 Most Expensive & Cheapest Cities To Live

You want to work abroad. You follow the steps, nail the interview and hear their salary offer.

Is it enough? How much is enough?

Sure, now you know how much you’re taking in. But how much will be going out? How much for a month’s rent, a loaf of bread, a gallon of gas?

For some cities, you’ll make more than enough to pay for a good life, plus sock away the rest in savings.

And for some cities, …well, you should have countered with a higher salary.

How should you have known? You could have known. Research.

For now, let me give you the 10 most expensive and the 10 cheapest cities. If your city isn’t one of them, read on.

Continue reading The World’s 10 Most Expensive & Cheapest Cities To Live

Working On a Cruise Ship: The Facts

Applying for and working on a cruise ship isn’t as pie-in-the-sky as you might expect, and with hundreds of people working above and below deck to ensure passengers have a fantastic experience, there might be a role that can put your talents, skills and experience to good use. So if you like the idea of waking up one morning in one port or harbour and the next in another, then read on…

Why work on a cruise ship?

Working on a a cruise ship gives you the opportunity to work with and for people of every age and nationality. The combination of socialising, working – heck, just living on the open seas attracts people from many nations and cultures wanting to give and experience more. Old sea dogs, university graduates, career changers, those supporting a family back home, the sheer number of people working on a cruise ship means that the environment on the high seas is a glorious combination of language, culture and experience.

Continue reading Working On a Cruise Ship: The Facts

Who the Hell Is Terry Fox?

 

I have a small life lesson to share: Don’t ever ask “Who the hell is Terry Fox?” when you’re talking to a Canadian.

You can say “Hmmm, it’s interesting you bring up Terry Fox, tell me more?” or say “I’m eager to learn more about Terry Fox.”

But please, trust me, you don’t want be snarky when asking about this Canadian legend.

Continue reading Who the Hell Is Terry Fox?

Learn the First 2000 Words of a Language

Okay, I often hear people say “How can I move to that country? I don’t know any of the language!

Well, even though learning the language is not necessary to move there, here is some help to get you started on learning that language.

How much can you learn? How about the first 2000 words?

What good is the first 2000 words? Well, actually, pretty great. In fact, it’s said that you can master just the most common 2000 words, you can survive 80% of casual conversations.

And even if this doesn’t make you a polyglot, it might just motivate you to move there for some face-to-face practice!  :-)

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/ccc?key=0AqBCQF7_ZKytdGlVTHZMTF9KR0JuYko4U3pKX19QbFE#gid=0

 

Technical Details: this spreadsheet actually uses a nifty Google docs-xcel function called “=GoogleTranslate(Cell, “en”,”XX”)”

If you guessed that dynamically translates the word from one cell (English) to another cell (language XX of your choice), then you’re right. Pretty cool, huh?

 

If you liked this, spread the word. Share with your friends — (and maybe you’ll practice together!)

What’s It Like to Drop Everything and Just Go?

We didn’t drop exactly everything. We kept our 11-month old daughter. :-)

But we did drop 2 high-paying jobs, a new home and our former lives in the US. For that, we become expats (sight-unseen) in Prague, Czech Republic. There we lived for 4 years. We bought there a new home (flat), had our 2nd child and made many great memories and friends.

After 4 years in Prague, we did the same, moving to the Canadian eastern seaboard. Been here now 3 years.

I’d say, to “drop everything” and move somewhere is like jumping into a colder-than-expected pool. It’s shocking and reinvigorating at the same time. And while you might regret the first second after the “jump,” you soon realize you would have regretted it much more if you hadn’t jumped in the first place.

 

Don’t continue on the path of eventual regret.

Jump. If by no other way, just jump.

If you need help, Jeff’s here.